Pressure Vessels and Their Functions

From distillation towers, to submarine and spaceship environments, to nuclear reactors and even hot water tanks, pressure vessels play a critical role in a variety of applications across the industrial and private sectors.

Alleviating the pressure

From distillation towers, to submarine and spaceship environments, to nuclear reactors and even hot water tanks, pressure vessels play a critical role in a variety of applications across the industrial and private sectors. As a key component of the energy industry, a properly designed pressure vessel enables refineries to maximize their production and operation of goods, such as processing petroleum and storing gasoline, while reducing costs and disruptions.

What is a pressure vessel?
A pressure vessel is a tank or container designed to process, distribute or store various gases, liquids and vapours at an internal pressure that differs significantly from its external one. This drastic change in pressure is derived from an external source or by applying heat from a direct or indirect source.

Basic components
A pressure vessel usually consists of three basic components. The first is the actual casing or shell of the vessel. Here, the pressure that will be applied to the vessel will determine the thickness of the shell. The next component consists of the necessary attachments, such as nozzle flanges or screwed or welded connectors, used to connect the vessel to the piping. Lastly, a base is designed to support the weight of the tank or container by taking different factors into consideration, such as external factors (like location) and the physical dimensions of the vessel.

The structure
While pressure vessels can be designed and fabricated to fit any particular shape and size, they usually come in two common designs. A spherical pressure vessel is extremely resilient as its shape allows for the even distribution of internal and external surface stresses. While this ensures that the structure has virtually no weak points, this type of design is generally more expensive to design and manufacture. Cylindrical pressure vessels, on the other hand, are less expensive to produce and are, as a result, more commonly used in storing pressurized liquids and gases. However, these types of vessels are fitted with hemispherical or dish heads or ends, which means that they are typically weaker than their spherical counterparts.

Combining safety and quality
A vessel that is incapable of handling a high allowable working pressure might result in the accidental release of its contents and is considered to be a very serious safety and environmental risk. That’s why it’s important to trust your pressure vessel fabrication to the best. At Moss Fabrication Ltd, our dedicated staff will design, build, inspect, test and deliver your pressure vessel in a safe and timely manner.

For additional information regarding our pressure vessels, contact us today!